Proper VHF ends are easier than you think

My soldering skills are marginal at best, and as a result I have used crimp-on VHF ends for the last 10+ years. While not wanting to admit this, I finally was chatting with some radio-savvy friends of mine, and they were aghast that I had even considered using one of these abominations. So I set out […]

My soldering skills are marginal at best, and as a result I have used crimp-on VHF ends for the last 10+ years. While not wanting to admit this, I finally was chatting with some radio-savvy friends of mine, and they were aghast that I had even considered using one of these abominations. So I set out to learn a better alternative without having to be a world-class solderer, or have someone do it for me.

I’ve learned from years of using VHF radios that the whole system has to be in good condition for the thing to work well. You can have a really fancy radio, but a crap antenna, and be frustrated that performance or quality suffers. Same goes for the cabling from the radio to the antenna itself.

When I bought Grace, I removed the really old, non-DSC radio that she came with, and replaced it with a B&G V50 which I wrote about a year or so ago. I still like the radio, but had been having some performance issues in the last 6 months that I had traced down to either the cable or the antenna.

Continue reading the full post on the Sailbits blog.

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