Using a FLIR ONE thermal camera aboard

A driving force in my years of building technomadic machines has been a toolset for seeing the world beyond the limitations of my usual senses… something that is not only intrinsically fascinating, but essential for diagnostics. The latest addition is a FLIR ONE thermal imaging camera (the Gen-3 USB-C model for Android; there is also […]

A driving force in my years of building technomadic machines has been a toolset for seeing the world beyond the limitations of my usual senses… something that is not only intrinsically fascinating, but essential for diagnostics. The latest addition is a FLIR ONE thermal imaging camera (the Gen-3 USB-C model for Android; there is also one with Lightning connector for iOS), and it joins the extensive suite of sensors, cameras, radios, probes, test instruments, microscopes, ROV (eventually), and other tools for getting a more detailed look at the world around me.

It has already been useful. In the first day of ownership, I’ve found a thermal issue on a friend’s boat, detected a few phantom loads, and gotten a better look at a serious airflow problem in my console that allows heat to build up dangerously on summer days.

The model I chose is the cheapest one, with only 80×60 thermal pixels, but they also have a higher-resolution (160×120) Pro version for Android, as well as an equivalent model for iOS… both at twice the price of the low-res models. For my relatively casual needs, the basic model at $199 is probably sufficient.

Read the full post on Nomadness.

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